PARTY

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We have officially consumed 180 rolls of film about a year and a half. In honor of this, we are officially having a potluck party on FRIDAY!

THIS FRIDAY.

DO NOT FLAKE.

Sign up to bring an item by responding via email or commenting in the comments below!

So far we have the following people bringing “something”:

  • Adrien: Plates
  • Jasmine: Chips
  • JAY: “SOMETHING”
  • Juan: A party platter of Jimmy John’s subs

Anyone else, please feel free to comment below or email me back with what you want to bring. Please note that we’ll still be printing, so you’ll remember to wash your hands before you head back into the darkroom from grubbing or vice-versa. See you all on Friday!

Chemical Measurements: A General Post

Since we now buy most of our chemicals in bulk powder form, this post is a general reminder for everyone (mostly myself) on how much powder to mix into how much water to make our paper developer. Please note that we have a small digital scale in the darkroom now which will make it easy to mix powder in the small quantities that we need so that we don’t end up mixing entire envelopes of this stuff all at once. We don’t have large enough containers to store them, after all. If you need to heat up water, use the electric kettle that’s in there as well; you can insert the thermometer to measure temperature into it through the spout.

To make 1 LITER of the stock paper developer solution:

  • Take 3/4 L (750 ML) of water at 100º-120ºF (use kettle)
  • Add 54 g of the Kodak Selectol Soft Developer (use scale and dry plastic beaker)
  • Stir until the powder is completely dissolved
  • Stir in another 1/4 L (250ml) of cold water

It’s usually good to go right there and then. The stock solution is still concentrated and needs to be diluted at a ratio of 1:1 prior to use in the darkroom for paper processing. Happy printing!

What Does America Look Like To Young People Today?

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Well… That’s just what the New York Times wants to find out. This is a photo contest open to high school students all across the country and is held every year by the New York Times in which you all take pictures of your neighborhoods, your schools, your friends, your family—basically, your lives—and I would love for each of you to have an opportunity to submit something to it. This is your chance for your pictures to be seen on a national level!

“Since we are soliciting submissions from teenagers in high school photography classes and community programs, participants must either be enrolled in high school or be 14 to 18 years old. All submissions must be uploaded under the supervision of a photography class teacher or program instructor by the May 1 deadline.”

They are not accepting any entries until March 30th because they really want you to take your time and really think about what you want your pictures to say about your lives and the lives of your community. So start taking film, loading your cameras and documenting your lives, folks! Really take your time and compose your shots, really start paying attention to the world around you and shoot it really, really well. I’ll be  here to develop (or help you develop) your film every Wednesday & Friday as usual.

Develop Negatives With Your Brain!

Here’s a little experiment I’ve been doing for quite a while. Your brain actually has the power to process a negative! For this experiment, you will need a plain white sheet of paper and about 40 seconds of your time. Now… Simply stare at the three colored dots in Stephanie’s hair for about 30 seconds. Now quickly look at the white sheet of paper and blink rapidly.

Stephanie

Congratulations! You have just processed a negative with MIND POWERS.

BONUS: This trick also works on black & white negatives, so if you’re unsure how your print might turn out before you expose it, try this out with a negative on top of the light table!

Hope you had a good Monday off, troops! I hope to see you all in class this Wednesday!

Class Schedule Change!

This past Wednesday was a no-show day for our class and, because of this, no one got a permission slip for a field trip we had planned with Redwood on Friday. While I realize that this trip was very short notice, it still would’ve been nice to go to on a nice little nature walk at the Kaweah Oak Preserve. Just so you all know, we have a new class schedule of when we’ll be in the dark room to make prints or develop film.

Wednesday: Room J-12 @3:30pm

Friday: Room J-12 @3:30pm

Please note that we no longer meet on Mondays unless you want to come by the lounge and pick up developed film, but we won’t be in the dark room on those days. Also, please remember that Mr. Yocum holds a writing lab tutorial in the computer lab outside the dark room on Wednesdays, so please be mindful that they are people studying just on the other side of our revolving door and let’s keep the noise to a minimum and head directly into the darkroom on that day; music is still okay since it’s mostly contained in the darkroom anyway. The sign-in sheet will be by the light tables in the back of the room from now on.

Have a good rest of your weekend, ladies and gentlemen!

New Photo Chemicals

As of last week, we have brand new photo processing chemicals in the lab. I have taken the liberty of mixing the fist batch of paper chemicals so you can come in and make prints. Please remember that the paper chemical needs to be diluted at a ratio of 1:1 in order to make it develop paper properly. Jake also found large-format Kodak paper in the refrigerator, so feel to come try your hand at making a 12×14 print!

Photo Menage Field Trip

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Don’t forget that this Friday is our field trip to Photo Menage Studio downtown for our studio lighting workshop with the photography class from Redwood. If you don’t have a permission slip to me by Thursday, you won’t be going. We’ll see you all then! If you gave me film to develop, it’s hanging up in the cabinet by the revolving door and, if you’re going to make prints, make sure you test the fixer to make sure it’s still strong. If you have any questions, you all know where to find me on campus.